The Weavings of Chicahuaxtla

In my first post about our #Mexigonus2017 expedition, I showed a photo of a brilliant red Mexigonus that was one of the inspirations of the study. We had found it in 1998, less than a kilometre northeast of San Andrés Chicahuaxtla, in Oaxaca. After our fulfilling time in Chiapas, we managed to arrange a visit to the area of Chicahuaxtla on the last day of the Oaxaca-Chiapas expedition, as we were driving back to Mexico City. I was filled with anticipation. I so much wanted to see the beautiful red “tomato” species again.

Early last Friday morning, we drove to Chicahuaxtla, where we met Amador Tello Rojas and Heladio Fernández Martinez. We weren’t able to go back to the exact site at which we’d found the red “tomato” beast in 1998, but Amador graciously allowed us to go to his family’s land, which was about 800 metres northwest of the 1998 site. The habitat was similar, oaks and pines in a fairly dry landscape.

We started to look on the ground and bushes beneath the oaks, and soon found a couple of small juvenile spiders that we thought were the red beast. But, we needed an adult male to be sure. After a long, frustrating search, a male finally fell onto my sheet. I was so excited — finally I’d see the red beast again! But, something was wrong. It should have had stout dark front legs; the one on my sheet had long delicate front legs with a little “feather” at the end. I got it in the vial, looked at it up close, and realized I had a brilliantly red spider, but different from the 1998 one. Here he is:

Mexigonus male from Chicahuaxtla

He’d certainly turn heads if he walked into a room.

Finding a new form so close to the red “tomato” beast confused me. It occupied what seemed to be the same microhabitat as the 1998 species, and it lived only 800 metres away. Do the two forms make contact between the two sites? They look closely related — do they hybridize? To add even more complexity, Jose Luis Castelo, a colleague who has done research on Mexigonus, noticed that our 1998 collection from Chicahuaxtla included a third fancy species, one that looked like our purple tomato. Three exquisite species of Mexigonus within one kilometre?

Are Chicahuaxtla’s mountains full of many beautiful Mexigonus, each occupying a small territory? Could it be that decorated Mexigonus exist as a pattern of many forms and colours spread across the landscape, evolved slowly over many generations, like the beautiful woven huipiles for which Chicahuaxtla is known?

In the end, we didn’t collect at the 1998 site, and so my desire to see the “tomato” species again remains unfulfilled. But, instead, we found a new and beautiful form. What we thought was a simple search has turned into a lot of questions about the diversity of ornamented Mexigonus in this mountain range.

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