Racing Stripes

People who know jumping spiders know that adult males of many species look different than females. Females are usually modestly coloured, but males may have bright colours they show to the females in elaborate dances. Some commonly-seen differences, however, don’t seem to relate to courtship. In many species, the males have distinctive black and white stripes, but the stripes are on their backs, which the females don’t see during the male’s courtship. Why do the males have stripes?

One of the most handsomely striped species I’ve ever seen is an undescribed Mexigonus from eastern Mexico. We caught it during our #Mexigonus2017 expedition at Sierra Gorda national park. Uriel calls this species “tuxedo” for the fancy suit the males wear. Here it is; on the left is the male, on the right the female.

Mexigonus “tuxedo”.

A similar male-female difference in stripes is seen in many other genera of jumping spiders, including some familiar in Canada such as Pelegrina, Eris, and Habronattus.

My best guess for the stripier pattern of males is that they move more than females. We have data from a few species of jumping spiders to indicate that males wander more, traversing a lot of territory in a day (looking for females?), while the females are relatively sedentary. An idea that’s been around for a while (e.g., look up Jackson, Ingram & Campbell 1976) is that what is good camouflage for an animal depends on how much it moves. If an animal sits still a lot, then it’s more cryptic if it’s mottled or spotted. If, on the other hand, an animal spends a lot of time moving forward, then longitudinal stripes can provide a disruptive visual effect that makes it harder for predators to see the moving animal. Hence, mobile males have stripes, homebody females not.

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